The mammoth sex paper brought a lot of media attention

When Cell Press informed us that they will prepare a press release for our paper in Current Biology, we hoped it might bring some media attention, but I certainly wasn't prepared for the incredible amount if interest from international and local media. So just in the days when I was supposed to concentrate on finishing manuscripts for my PhD thesis, I was spending a lot of time replying to requests on comments and doing interviews. As a PhD student, I haven't had much of experience talking to the journalists, so it's been an exciting and slightly stressful experience.

As the embargo went down, I spent hours sitting in front of my computer, refreshing my Twitter feed and sharing all the news articles with the co-authors in our group Slack channel.

Here's a list of some of the news articles that covered our study:

  • The New York Times
    Male Mammoths Died in ‘Silly Ways’ More Often Than Females, Study Finds
  • The Economist
    Mammoth society seems to have been like that of modern elephants
  • IFL Science
    Male Mammoths Were More Likely To Fall Into Traps As They Were Reckless Loners
  • The Guardian
    Huge news: scientists solve mystery of dead male woolly mammoths
  • Inverse
    Ancient Male Wooly Mammoths Lacking Female Leadership Wound Up Dead
  • ScienceNews
    What male bias in the mammoth fossil record says about the animal’s social groups
  • phys.org
    Male mammoths more often fell into 'natural traps' and died, DNA evidence suggests
  • Live Science
    Trapped! Woolly Mammoth Bachelors Often Met Disastrous Ends
  • Cosmos Magazine
    Male mammoths were good at falling in holes
  • Science
    Male mammoths fell into traps more than females, giving clues to family structure
  • Discover Magazine
    Woolly Mammoth Bachelors Skew the Fossil Record
  • The Times of London
    Mammoth blunders: males were just less savvy than their female counterparts
  • The Naked Scientists
    Life for bachelor mammoths was the pits!
  • Daily Mail
    Male woolly mammoths who lacked female leadership were more likely to get themselves killed
  • News Week
    Male mammoths didn't have anyone to ask for directions and died more often because of it
  • Tech Times
    Lone Male Mammoths More Risk-Taking, Fell Into More Traps Than Females
  • Gizmodo
    Why Did Male Mammoths Get Stuck in Traps More Often Than Female Mammoths?
  • Popular Science
    Male woolly mammoths lived fast, died young, and left more corpses
  • The Local
    Swedish research reveals why most mammoth fossils are male